Home Archives 2008 October

Monthly Archives: October 2008

The July 2008 issue of the Journal of Commercial Biotechnology is now available. The links below will take you to the abstract for each paper:

Volume 14, Issue 4

Editorial

Continuing education in biotechnologyPDF
Yali Friedman

Articles

Can compliance help marketing and business development?PDF
John Avellanet
Money for nothing? Risks in biopharmaceutical companies from the perspective of public financiersPDF
Laura Heinonen, Birgitta Sandberg
Got value? Determine it. Demonstrate it. Communicate it. Realise itPDF
Mitch DeKoven, Elisabeth H Hazard, Erica Goldberg, Shibani Pokras
Value-driven project and portfolio management in the pharmaceutical industry: Drug discovery versus drug development – Commonalities and differences in portfolio management practicePDF
Kerstin M Bode-Greuel, Klaus J Nickisch

From the Classroom

Open content textbooks: Educating the next generation of bioentrepreneurs in developing economiesPDF
Arlen D Meyers, Donald J McCubbrey, Richard T Watson

Legal and Regulatory Updates

Legal and regulatory updatePDF
Gerry Kamstra, John Wilkinson

Book Reviews

Book Review: The Regulatory Challenge of BiotechnologyPDF
John Avellanet
Book Review: Intellectual Property and Biotechnology: Biological InventionsPDF
Stefan M Miller
Book Review: Commercializing Successful Biomedical TechnologiesPDF
Arlen D Meyers
Book Review: Enterprise for Life Scientists: Developing Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the BiosciencesPDF
Arlen D Meyers
Best Practices in Biotechnology Business DevelopmentPDF
Hans-Erik Hamid Lydecker
Genetic Glass Ceilings: Transgenics for Crop BiodiversityPDF
Drew L Kershen
Biotechnology and the LawPDF
Edward L Korwek
Welcome to Biotech NationPDF
James Rogers

Guest content from John Avellanet, managing director and principal of Cerulean Associates:

Intellectual Property Theft on the Rise

John Avellanet

By John Avellanet, Managing Director and Principal of Cerulean Associates LLC

Reprinted with permission from SMARTERCOMPLIANCE™ 2(9): p 1-2 (September 2008)

Nine out of ten companies do not have appropriate policies and controls in place to stop employees, contractors or partners from walking out the door with intellectual property and trade secrets.

For those of us who’ve spent much of our careers helping prevent corporate espionage, the July report by the not-for-profit IT Policy Compliance consortium comes as little surprise.

Protecting Information

Passwords and patents do not make your company’s information and discoveries any more secure than locks and labels make your home and its belongings safe from theft.

Carnegie Mellon University’s CERT research think tank has followed information theft for decades and has come to two eye-opening conclusions:

  • · Most confidential information theft comes from people you know—employees, contractors, suppliers or even partners (especially for co-developed products); and
  • · More than 30% of this type of theft comes from people working in your computer department (IT/ICT).

Given all the security efforts around stopping outsiders when the real risk lies within, is it any wonder that 90% of businesses do not have any way to stop—much less even detect—intellectual property (IP) and trade secret theft?

Improving Your Chances

Before we even get down to work on reasonable trade secret controls, I give my clients a brief set of “yes/no” questions to answer on their own.

These questions are straightforward and easily answered in less than 30 minutes. For instance, “Do you have a ‘clean desk’ policy for sensitive or confidential information?”

The goal of these questions is to help my clients quickly outline their weaknesses—and their strengths. In this way, we can quickly shift into discussing solutions.

And while many executives need the more detailed audit with its prioritized recommendations, keep in mind that a half-dozen quick-fixes implemented now can stop today’s disgruntled employee or frustrated contractor from sabotaging your work.

Two Quick Fixes to Take Today

Ask yourself, What documented proof do we have that our policies are being followed?

For instance, a typical “clear desk” policy requires personnel to clear their desk and office area of confidential information before they leave for the day, locking it in a file cabinet, turning it back over to the document specialist for filing and so on.

When companies state they do this, my reaction is always to be skeptical. How do you know this is actually being followed?

If your people turn sensitive material over to an archivist, that individual should have log files that can be reviewed.

However, what proof do you have that people are clearing their desk and securing their office area?

A simple way to test this is to simply stay late one evening and walk around, from cubicle to cubicle, office to office. How many documents do you see labeled “confidential” or “private” or “trade secret” sitting out? How many documents do you quickly recognize that should be labeled “confidential” or “trade secret” (such as product drawings or formulations) but that aren’t labeled and aren’t put away?

Then, take the next step. Ask your internal auditors (or hire an outside independent auditor) to include this in their regular audit routine. Assuming no other extenuating circumstances, I usually suggest my clients audit this once or twice a year (perhaps more for habitual “offender” departments).

Final Thoughts

I’ve made a free version of my intellectual property and trade secret security checklist available for download. You can use this to quickly assess your strengths and opportunities for improvement.

You can get your free PDF copy here: http://www.ceruleanllc.com/biotechblog

Are you ready?

About the Author

John Avellanet is a former Fortune 50 subsidiary C-level medical device and biotechnology executive where he created, developed and ran his firm’s Records Management and IT departments, and was directly accountable for trade secret protection. In 2006, he founded his independent consulting firm, Cerulean Associates LLC (www.ceruleanllc.com) and has since become one of the leading experts on trade secret and corporate espionage protection for biotech, pharmaceutical and device companies.

Two upcoming talks on biotechnology career development strategies at Johns Hopkins campuses:

Homewood Campus
Friday, Oct. 17th 2008 5:30-7:30pm
Remsen Hall Rm 101
3400 North Charles Street

East Baltimore Campus
Wednesday, Oct. 22nd 2008 5:30-7:30pm
Wood Basic Science Auditorium
725 Wolfe Street

Signed copies of my books will also be available for sale. For more details, contact connect@hopkinsbiotechnetwork.org.

I’d like to build on the success of my “Best Practices in Biotechnology…” book series by producing more edited compilations focused on discrete industry topics such as:

  • Marketing
  • IP management
  • R&D management
  • Communications
  • etc.

If you are interested in leading one of these projects and editing a topical compilation, please visit the Logos Press Submission Guidelines and tell me about your vision.

Courtesy of DrugPatentWatch.com:

Drug Patent Expirations in October2008

*Drugs may be covered by multiple patents

TradenameApplicantGeneric NamePatent NumberPatent Expiration
CASODEXAstrazenecabicalutamide4,636,505Oct 1, 2008
CONDYLOXWatson Pharmspodofilox5,057,616Oct 15, 2008
COSOPTMerckdorzolamide hydrochloride; timolol maleate4,797,413Oct 28, 2008
ELIGARDQlt Usaleuprolide acetate4,938,763Oct 3, 2008
ELIGARDQlt Usaleuprolide acetate5,733,950Oct 3, 2008
ELIGARDQlt Usaleuprolide acetate5,739,176Oct 3, 2008
ELIGARDQlt Usaleuprolide acetateRE37950Oct 3, 2008
FERIDEX I.V.Amag Pharms Incferumoxides5,055,288Oct 8, 2008
GASTROMARKAmag Pharms Incferumoxsil5,055,288Oct 8, 2008
IONSYSAlzafentanyl hydrochloride5,232,438Oct 3, 2008
MIRCETTEDurameddesogestrel; ethinyl estradiolRE35724Oct 20, 2008
TRUSOPTMerckdorzolamide hydrochloride4,797,413Oct 28, 2008
ZEMURONOrganon Usa Incrocuronium bromide4,894,369Oct 13, 2008

Courtesy of DrugPatentWatch.com