Monthly Archives: November 2009

Drug Patent Expirations for December 2009

Tradename Applicant Generic Name Patent Number Patent Expiration
MIGRANAL Valeant dihydroergotamine mesylate 5,169,849 Dec 8, 2009
PHOTOFRIN Axcan Scandipharm porfimer sodium 5,145,863 Dec 15, 2009
XENICAL Hoffmann La Roche orlistat 4,598,089*PED Dec 18, 2009
CEDAX Sciele Pharma Inc ceftibuten dihydrate 4,812,561 Dec 20, 2009
OXILAN-300 Guerbet ioxilan 4,954,348 Dec 21, 2009
OXILAN-350 Guerbet ioxilan 4,954,348 Dec 21, 2009
DEFINITY Lantheus Medcl perflutren 6,146,657 Dec 22, 2009
ZANTAC 150 Glaxosmithkline ranitidine hydrochloride 5,102,665*PED Dec 23, 2009
VALTREX Glaxosmithkline valacyclovir hydrochloride 4,957,924*PED Dec 23, 2009
ZIAGEN Glaxosmithkline abacavir sulfate 5,089,500*PED Dec 26, 2009
TRIZIVIR Glaxosmithkline abacavir sulfate; lamivudine; zidovudine 5,089,500*PED Dec 26, 2009
EPZICOM Smithkline Beecham abacavir sulfate; lamivudine 5,089,500*PED Dec 26, 2009
CORVERT Pharmacia And Upjohn ibutilide fumarate 5,155,268 Dec 28, 2009

*Drugs may be covered by multiple patents or regulatory protections. See the DrugPatentWatch database for complete details.

Courtesy of DrugPatentWatch.com

This information is also available in an email newsletter: Subscribe to the DrugPatentWatch Patent Expiration Bulletin.

This is my initial response to the Kyoto Prize, which I was able to attend on a fellowship from Point Loma Nazarene University. For more details on the Kyoto Prize see my previous post.

kyotoprizeI had an opportunity to interact with each of the laureates, and focused on the question of how it was that they were able to accomplish their exemplary achievements. It is not enough to simply be brilliant or hard-working — all their peers likely share these characteristics. What are the differentiating factors that enabled their unique achievements?

I am still working on an expanded discussion for more formal publication, and I’ll link to the article when it is available. However, not to leave you in suspense, I’ll note that I was surprised by how well the enabling factors aligned with each laureate’s field — technology, basic sciences, and arts and philosophy.

At a recent event on the comparative advantages of small molecule vs. biologic drugs, several themes emerged which led me to re-examine the question of whether the practice of medicine is capable of keeping pace with medical innovation.

As mentioned in a previous post, the majority of patients receiving the personalized medicine drug Herceptin had not been previously administered Herceptin’s diagnostic test. This is extremely important, as the diagnostic test can identify those patients most likely to benefit from the drug and exclude those who are likely to see no benefits (and will likely only get sicker as they rotate through an ineffective drug). For all the talk of the promise of personalized medicine, it appears that the gatekeepers — physicians and payers — are unaware of how to effectively prescribe¬† personalized drugs.

This is not a new phenomenon. Antibiotic drugs have seen their effectiveness drop due to overprescription, which led to the emergence and rapid spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

So, just as mis-prescription of antibiotics took the shine off many lucrative drugs, mis-prescription of personalized medicines stands to likewise diminish their value. What is particularly surprising is that this is not a new trend. For all the advances in drug development over the decades since over-prescription of antibiotics was recognized as a problem, physicians and payers are still hard pressed to prescribe drugs effectively.

When I asked the panel of potential solutions to the problem, I was given a list of emerging technologies such as bioinformatics, e-health, centralized databases, etc. that could solve the problem; adding technology to a problem isn’t necessarily going to solve it, it may just make it a more expensive problem! In reality the solution already exists. All healthcare payers need to do is require prior authorization before prescribing Herceptin, which would require physician consultation, and require a positive result in the diagnostic test prior to reimbursement for the drug.

As with most simple solutions, I’m sure that this one has already been conceived. So why is it not being used? Could it be that healthcare payers are afraid they might end up having to use a litany of diagnostic tests on all cancer patients, thereby offsetting any potential costs savings? I look forward to your thoughts in the comments section below.

Drug Patent Expirations for November 2009

Tradename Applicant Generic Name Patent Number Patent Expiration
ACULAR LS Allergan ketorolac tromethamine 5,110,493*PED Nov 5, 2009
ACULAR Allergan ketorolac tromethamine 5,110,493*PED Nov 5, 2009
PREVPAC Takeda Pharms Na amoxicillin; clarithromycin; lansoprazole 4,628,098*PED Nov 10, 2009
PREVACID IV Takeda Pharms Na lansoprazole 4,628,098*PED Nov 10, 2009
ACEON Solvay Pharms perindopril erbumine 5,162,362 Nov 10, 2009
PREVACID Takeda Pharms Na lansoprazole 4,628,098*PED Nov 10, 2009
PREVACID NAPRAPAC 500 (COPACKAGED) Takeda Pharms Na lansoprazole; naproxen 4,628,098*PED Nov 10, 2009
CARDENE Ekr Therap nicardipine hydrochloride 5,164,405 Nov 17, 2009
TROVAN PRESERVATIVE FREE Pfizer alatrofloxacin mesylate 5,164,402 Nov 17, 2009
RESCULA R Tech Ueno Ltd unoprostone isopropyl 5,166,178 Nov 24, 2009
ATROVENT HFA Boehringer Ingelheim ipratropium bromide 5,766,573 Nov 28, 2009
PROAIR HFA Teva Global albuterol sulfate 6,352,684 Nov 28, 2009
QVAR 40 Teva Global beclomethasone dipropionate 5,766,573 Nov 28, 2009
XOPENEX HFA Sepracor levalbuterol tartrate 6,352,684 Nov 28, 2009
QVAR 80 Teva Global beclomethasone dipropionate 6,352,684 Nov 28, 2009
PROAIR HFA Teva Global albuterol sulfate 5,766,573 Nov 28, 2009
PROVENTIL-HFA 3m albuterol sulfate 6,352,684 Nov 28, 2009
QVAR 40 Teva Global beclomethasone dipropionate 6,352,684 Nov 28, 2009
QVAR 80 Teva Global beclomethasone dipropionate 5,766,573 Nov 28, 2009

*Drugs may be covered by multiple patents or regulatory protections. See the DrugPatentWatch database for complete details.

Courtesy of DrugPatentWatch.com

This information is also available in an email newsletter: Subscribe to the DrugPatentWatch Patent Expiration Bulletin.